80s

  • A taste of the 80s! Lovely Smarties novelty 110 camera. This would make a great talking point ornament or use it as a real camera!

    Sold By: Rewind Cameras

    This is a lovely bright and fun novelty 110 camera. Film is still readily available and this would make a great party camera. It easily fits in pocket and is great fun to use. Note this does need a film in it to function. This has been checked and appears to work as it should.

  • Number one 110 film camera, boxed with the original paperwork and vouchers (expired in 1989) this is a fun little camera and collectable.

    Sold By: Rewind Cameras

    This is a lovely snapshot of the 1980s … literally ! This has the original box and papers and in working order. Just add 110 film and start shooting or add to you collection.

    110 Film Cartridges

    check out the new 110 film for this little beauty !

  • Nikon F80 Body 35mm Film Camera

    The F80 was introduced on January 27, 2000 to the worldwide consumer market. It was the successor to the F70 and was based on the highly successful F100 with the notable lack of the weatherproofing and ruggedness that characterizes that camera.

    Three versions of the F80 are available, the F80, the F80D which has a different back that can imprint date information on the frame and the F80S which can also imprint exposure data between frames in addition to the date information. Using the exposure data imprint function will slow the F80 varying on film speed and temperature

    The F80 keeps with the traditional look of Nikon camera bodies, with a black plastic exterior, white Nikon lettering on the prism with a red rubber insert on the inside of the camera’s grip.

    The F80 accepts all F-mount Nikkor lenses with the exception of many pre AI, and all IX, lenses (these cannot be mounted on the F80 without causing damage). Older non-CPU AI and AIS lenses can be mounted on the camera, but exposure must be set manually as the camera will not meter through them at all.

    The F80 was the first Nikon camera to feature on-demand grid line

  • Minox 35ML Film Camera

    The Minox name carries James Bond cachet and the Minox 35 line has the honor of being the smallest production full-frame 35mm camera made. When sold in the 1980s the ML 35 was a high end and expensive item. These days they still have a enthusiastic band of follower. Due to the digital revolution Minox 35’s are not fetching high prices any more – if you can find one in working condition they still make great pocket cameras that will give far better results than a LOMO. The 35 ML’s lens is a 35mm f2.8 and it is scale focusing. Its exposure system is automatic or aperture priority.

    The Minox 35 ML bears a very strong resemblance to the Balda CA 35; both cameras, as well as the rest of the Minox 35 and 110 line, were manufactured by Balda Kamera-Werk in Bünde, West Germany.

    Camera Type: 35mm full frame compact camera.
    Film Format: 35mm film
    Lens: 35 mm f/2.8
    Focusing Range: 0.9m to infinity
    Exposure meter: auto or aperture priority
    Shutter Speeds: 1/500 to more than 2 seconds
    Film Speed Range: ISO 25 16001615) 33 33O 400 (DIN 27)
    Focusing System: Scale focus
    Flash Synchronization: Hot shoe contacts
    Self Timer: 8 sec. delay
    Battery: One 6 volts V28px
    Dimensions: 100 x 62 x 31mm
    Weight: 180 g

  • Pentax Super A 35mm Film Camera with Tokina 28-70mm f/3.5 Zoom Lens and Strap

    The Pentax Super-A, also sold in some markets as the Pentax Super Program was a 35 mm single-lens reflex camera produced by Pentax of Japan in the 1980s.

    It is not the same camera as the slightly lower-specified “Pentax Program A” (which also had an alternative name, the “Pentax Program Plus”.)

    The camera offers fully automatic exposure (“program”) mode when coupled with an appropriate Pentax-A series lens. With such a lens the camera also offers shutter-priority mode, and with any compatible lens (i.e. Pentax-M lenses in addition to the Pentax-A series) the camera offers aperture-priority and fully manual modes.

    The shutter speeds, selected by up/down buttons rather than the conventional wheel, run from 1/2000 of a second to 15 seconds, plus a “bulb” mode. There is flash synchronisation at 1/125 of a second. Unlike the camera’s most direct predecessor, the semi-automatic Pentax ME-Super, this model cannot function at 1/125 of a second, or at all, once the batteries have been exhausted. Speed is displayed on an LCD panel on the top of the camera adjacent to the buttons (which also shows whether the camera is cocked), and both speed and aperture are visible on LCD displays inside the viewfinder. These receive natural light through a translucent plastic window on the pentaprism housing and can be electrically lit at the press of a button. Also in the viewfinder, centred, is a split image focus aid surrounded by a microprism ring.

    A further improvement over the ME Super was the inclusion of a depth-of-field preview lever. The camera also featured a self-timer, which was electronic rather than the manual lever of its predecessors. The available ISO film speed choices were extended too, and run from 6 to 3200 ASA.

    As with the previous M series cameras, there is a window next to the winder arm which indicated film movement, and assists the user in rewinding film into the cassette without losing the tip of the film.

    Metering is through the lens. Camera also features direct TTL flash metering.

    The Super A version was available with a black top-plate (and matching base), the Super Program version was available with a chrome-coloured top-plate (and matching base). The main body, plastic grip, and lenses were always black.

    The European camera of the year version(1983) had a small round brass plate on the front lefthand side of the body. This all came with a lens cap and strap with the European camera of the year insignia.

  • Halina AF810 35mm Film Camera RED

    Haking of Hong Kong offered this 35mm point and shoot camera in red or black—a classic of regrettable 1980s styling tendencies. As the “AF” designation suggests, this model offered autofocus as well as automatically adjusting the meter for the speed of the loaded film, via its DX coding.

    From the manual:

    Lens: f/3.8 34mm coated glass triplet
    Shutter: fully programmed electronic shutter
    Exposure control: fully automatic
    Focusing: full automatic focusing
    Film drive: full automatic wind and rewind
    Flash: guide number 35 (feet at ISO 100)
    Batteries: 2 x AA alkaline type

  • Pentax Super A 35mm Film Camera with SMC Pentax A 50mm f/1.7 Lens

    Fully working camera.

    The Pentax Super-A, also sold in some markets as the Pentax Super Program was a 35 mm single-lens reflex camera produced by Pentax of Japan in the 1980s.

    It is not the same camera as the slightly lower-specified “Pentax Program A” (which also had an alternative name, the “Pentax Program Plus”.)

    The camera offers fully automatic exposure (“program”) mode when coupled with an appropriate Pentax-A series lens. With such a lens the camera also offers shutter-priority mode, and with any compatible lens (i.e. Pentax-M lenses in addition to the Pentax-A series) the camera offers aperture-priority and fully manual modes.

    The shutter speeds, selected by up/down buttons rather than the conventional wheel, run from 1/2000 of a second to 15 seconds, plus a “bulb” mode. There is flash synchronisation at 1/125 of a second. Unlike the camera’s most direct predecessor, the semi-automatic Pentax ME-Super, this model cannot function at 1/125 of a second, or at all, once the batteries have been exhausted. Speed is displayed on an LCD panel on the top of the camera adjacent to the buttons (which also shows whether the camera is cocked), and both speed and aperture are visible on LCD displays inside the viewfinder. These receive natural light through a translucent plastic window on the pentaprism housing and can be electrically lit at the press of a button. Also in the viewfinder, centred, is a split image focus aid surrounded by a microprism ring.

    A further improvement over the ME Super was the inclusion of a depth-of-field preview lever. The camera also featured a self-timer, which was electronic rather than the manual lever of its predecessors. The available ISO film speed choices were extended too, and run from 6 to 3200 ASA.

    As with the previous M series cameras, there is a window next to the winder arm which indicated film movement, and assists the user in rewinding film into the cassette without losing the tip of the film.

    Metering is through the lens. Camera also features direct TTL flash metering.

    The Super A version was available with a black top-plate (and matching base), the Super Program version was available with a chrome-coloured top-plate (and matching base). The main body, plastic grip, and lenses were always black.

    The European camera of the year version(1983) had a small round brass plate on the front lefthand side of the body. This all came with a lens cap and strap with the European camera of the year insignia.

  • Canon AE-1 Program 35mm Film Camera with Canon FD 35-105mm f/3.5 Lens with lens Filter, Cap and Strap

    The camera it’s fully working, with new light seals.

    The Canon AE-1 is a 35 mm single-lens reflex (SLR) film camera for use with interchangeable lenses. It was manufactured by Canon Camera K. K. (today Canon Incorporated) in Japan from April 1976 to 1984. It uses an electronically controlled, electromagnet horizontal cloth focal plane shutter, with a speed range of 2 to 1/1000 second plus Bulb and flash X-sync of 1/60th second. The camera body is 87 mm tall, 141 mm wide, and 48 mm deep; it weighs 590 g. Most are black with chrome trim, but some are all black.

    The AE-1 is a historically significant SLR, both because it was the first microprocessor-equipped SLR and because of its sales, backed by a major advertising campaign, the AE-1 sold over one million units,[1]:66 which made it an unprecedented success in the SLR market.

    The AE-1 has a Canon FD breech-lock lens mount and accepts any FD or New FD (FDn) lens. It is not compatible with Canon’s later Canon EF lens mount, though adapters made by independent manufacturers can be found. The camera will also accept Canon’s earlier FL-mount lenses through the use of stop-down metering.[2] Original FD lenses, introduced in 1971, did not rotate in the mounting process; instead, a locking ring at the base was turned to attach the lens. This was often criticized as being slower than the bayonet mounts of competing cameras.[1]:201 The counter argument, though, was that as the lens/body mating surfaces did not rotate, there was no wear that could affect the critical distance from lens to film plane. In 1979, Canon introduced the New FD series of lenses that rotate the whole outer lens barrel to lock. The inner lens barrel remained stationary, and thus the signal levers and pins still did not rotate. During the late 1970s, there were over 50 Canon FD lenses available for purchase. They ranged from a Fisheye FD 15 mm f/2.8 SSC to a FD 800 mm f/5.6 SSC, plus special purpose lenses such as a 7.5mm circular fisheye and a 35 mm tilt and shift lens.

    Accessories for the AE-1 included the Canon Winder A (motorized single frame film advance up to 2 frames per second), the Canon Databack A (sequential numbering or date stamping on the film), and the Canon Speedlite 155A (guide number 56/17 (feet/meters) at ASA 100) and Canon Speedlite 177A (guide number 83/25 (feet/meters) at ASA 100) electronic flashes. The later Power winder A2 was also compatible, but the Motor Drive MA was not.

    The AE-1 is a battery-powered (one 4LR44 or 4SR44) microprocessor-controlled manual focus SLR. It supports either manual exposure control or shutter priority auto exposure. The exposure control system consists of a needle pointing along a vertical f-stop scale on the right side of the viewfinder to indicate the readings of the built-in light meter (center-weighted with a silicon photocell). The viewfinder used by the AE-1 is Canon’s standard split image rangefinder with microprism collar focusing aids.

    Design history

    Canon AE-1 detail
    The AE-1 was the first in what became a complete overhaul of Canon’s line of SLRs. The 1970s and 1980s were an era of intense competition between the major Japanese SLR brands: Canon, Nikon, Minolta, Pentax and Olympus. Between 1975 and 1985, there was a dramatic departure from heavy all-metal manual mechanical camera bodies to much more compact bodies with integrated circuit (IC) electronic automation. In addition, due to rapid advances in electronics, the brands leap-frogged each other with successively more automated models.

    Although Canon Camera K. K. had been making quality 35 mm cameras for decades, it had always been overshadowed by their rival Nippon Kokagu K. K. and their Nikon cameras. While Canons easily led in the amateur compact fixed-lens rangefinder market (where Nikons did not compete), Canon SLRs had far less cachet than Nikon SLRs. Nikon, with its solid reputation for quality of material and workmanship, held a stranglehold on the prestigious professional SLR market that competitors could not break.

    The AE-1 was the vanguard of the landmark Canon amateur level A-series SLRs and led Canon’s charge into the emerging electronically controlled SLR market. The other members of the A-series were the AT-1 (released 1977), A-1 (1978), AV-1 (1979), AE-1 Program (1981) and AL-1 (1982). They all used the same compact aluminum alloy chassis, but with different feature levels and outer cosmetic plastic top panel. By sharing most major components, including an inexpensive horizontal cloth-curtain shutter, viewfinder information display, and autoflash control, Canon further reduced costs and could undercut the price of the more expensive SLRs then on the market.

    In keeping with its cost-cutting philosophy, Canon designed the AE-1 to use a significant amount of structural plastic for a lighter and cheaper camera at the expense of being less impact resistant. Canon went to great effort to disguise the use of plastic – the injection-molded acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) for the top panel finished with either satin chrome (or black enameled) to give the look and feel of metal. The bottom plate were made of brass and then finished with satin chrome (or black enameled). Extensive use of electronics also allowed simpler modular internal construction instead of mechanical linkages. Five major and 25 minor internal modules reduced the individual parts count by over 300. Modular construction, in turn, allowed automated production lines in order to reduce cost. Unfortunately, cost concerns also resulted in the use of plastic in some of the moving/operating mechanisms.

    The AE-1 was never designed to be a professional camera. However, it was made to have relatively straightforward controls and automatic aperture for newcomers, with various manual controls and system accessories to appeal to more experienced photographers. The AE-1 was the first SLR purchased by millions of amateur photographers, persuaded by its feature list and low price.

    In many ways, the AE-1 represented the confluence of two streams of Canon camera development. The first generation electronically controlled 35 mm SLR Canon EF (1973) merged with the final generation rangefinder Canonet G-III QL17 (1972). After decades of chasing Nikon for Japanese optical supremacy, Canon finally hit upon a formula for success: high technology for ease of use, cheaper internal parts and electronics for lower price, and heavy advertising to get the message out. Despite outcries from traditionalist photographers who complained about an “excess” of automation ruining the art of photography, automation proved to be the only way to entice the amateur photographer.

    The AE-1 had only one pointer needle used to indicate the light meter recommended f-stop, and neither a follower needle to indicate the actual lens set f-stop, nor plus/minus indicators for over/underexposure. The shutter-priority system of the AE-1 was more suited to sports action than to preserving depth-of-field, yet the 1/1000 s top speed of its horizontally traveling shutter limited its use for such activities. The battery door design was subject to frequent breakage, and over time owners have reported instances of shutter and mechanical gremlins, including mirror linkage wear (the “Canon squeal”). Canon’s eventual abandonment of the FD lens mount for the EOS autofocus design also had an effect on prices for the AE-1 on the used market.

    Vintage Camera Hut

  • Carl Zeiss Jena DDR 180mm 1:2.8 Lens for Pentacon Six 6 Mount with Lens Hood

    Carl Zeiss Jena Sonnar 180mm F/2.8 (P6 medium format)

    The first Sonnar 2.8/180mm ‘Olympia Sonnar” introduced for Berlin Olympic Games in 1936 was a range finder lens. SLR versions did not appear until after the WW2 when Carl Zeiss was split into western and eastern companies. Carl Zeiss Jena DDR continued manufacture for Pentacon, Exacta and M42 mounts until reunification in early 1990s. Carl Zeiss West Germany introduced a Contax Sonnar T* 180mm f/2.8 a new design, derived from the famed Olympia Sonnar in the 1980s.

    Carl Zeiss Jena Sonnar may also be labelled “Carl Zeiss Jena S” or “Aus Jena S” lens remains exactly the same.

    Four basic versions of Carl Zeiss Jena Sonnar 180mm F2.8:

    1. Aluminium finish often with leather band grip – 1956-1963
    2. Black with hard plastic focus ring with raised ovals sometimes referred to as “Star Wars edition” 1961 – 1963.
    3. Black with bright aluminium stripes on focus ring “Zebra” 1963 – 1967.
    4. All black 1967 – 1978. From 1978 – 1990 with Multi-coating denoted by “MC” marking. All previous were single coated.

    The lens here is the type 2 “Star Wars” Carl Zeiss Jena Sonnar 2.8/180 ASB

    5 elements in 3 groups, Single coating.
    F/2.8 -F/22 auto diaphram.
    Min Focus distance ~ 2m
    Rotatable tripod mount
    Filter size 86mm
    Weight: 1.1 kg bare ~1.5 kg including M42 adapter and hood
    Diameter: ~100mm
    Length: 140 – 160mm including M42 adapter
    215 – 235 with hood.

    Interesting to note this lens has automatic diaphragm compensation mechanism that opens the diaphragm at close focussing distance to maintain correct effective aperture.

  • Bairette Vintage 35mm Film Camera with Case

    Beirette was a name applied to a long sequence of compact 35mm viewfinder camera models, made from 1958 to the 1980s in East Germany by Beier. There were also some folding Beirettes, made from 1939, but production apparently disappeared during WWII. Although the name stayed the same, various tweaks in the design were made. It was the first camera that came out of the former East Germany that had a rapid advance lever. It is a very compact, little simple camera, and the first thing you notice is the beautifully designed shutter release button placed on the front. There are many models and versions during its very long manufacturing period. Flash sync, for example, moved from a pin of the lens barrel to a standard hot shoe, and a plastic shutter release button replaced the original metal one in the mid-1970s. Several versions of this camera were sold by Boots, for example the Boots Beirette BL, or branded as Revue for export markets.

  • Beirette Vintage 35mm Film Camera with Case

    Beirette was a name applied to a long sequence of compact 35mm viewfinder camera models, made from 1958 to the 1980s in East Germany by Beier. There were also some folding Beirettes, made from 1939, but production apparently disappeared during WWII. Although the name stayed the same, various tweaks in the design were made. Flash sync, for example, moved from a pin of the lens barrel to a standard hot shoe, and a plastic shutter release button replaced the original metal one in the mid-1970s. Several versions of this camera were sold by Boots, for example the Boots Beirette BL, or branded as Revue for export markets.

  • Polaroid 636 CloseUP Instant Film Camera with Box

    Film tested! Fully working. Near mint condition

    This refurbished vintage Polaroid 636 Close Up camera from the 1980s has been restored, tested and is ready for another generation of photo taking. All you need is a pack of Polaroid 600 film and this camera is ready to shoot!

  • Polaroid Cool Cam Instant Film Camera

    This vintage Polaroid Cool Cam camera from the 1980s has been restored, tested and is ready for another generation of photo taking. All you need is a pack of Polaroid 600 film and this camera is ready to shoot!

  • Polaroid Cool Cam Instant Film Camera

    This vintage Polaroid Cool Cam camera from the 1980s has been restored, tested and is ready for another generation of photo taking. All you need is a pack of Polaroid 600 film and this camera is ready to shoot!

  • Vintage 1980s large silver tone metal star earrings with diamante centre

    This is a stunning pair of silver tone metal clip on star shaped earrings dating from the 1980s. They have a diamante style centre. Great vintage condition. The silver metal has a tarnished effect finish but may polish up if required.
    Clips in good working order.
    Measurements across.
    35mm approx

  • Vintage costume clip on earrings | 1980s | faux pearl

    An elegant pair of clip on earrings dating from around the 1980s. They come in a gold tone metal with a faux pearl centre and diamante trim.
    A tiny bit of wear to the pearl finish but nothing obvious until close inspection. Clips in good working order.

    Measurements approx.
    20mm across

  • Retro patchwork travel bag by Antelope Fashion | multiple compartments | expandable

    This is a vintage travel bag by Antelope Fashion in brown patchwork leather look. Dating from around the 1980s-90s. It has multiple compartments and pockets to organise and carry all your travel items safely. It has 2 shoulder straps and fastens with a magnetic stud.
    It comes in good clean vintage condition, a little fraying to inside edge of one compartment, as shown in photo. Maybe a strip of washi tape would prevent it worsening. Apart from this it has had little wear.
    Expandable.
    Measures 12″ x 10″

    Find more great vintage items in my shop @:
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/dottysvintagefinds

    £10.00£14.00
  • Vintage Jean Claire navy blue 1980s short sleeved blouse, summer lightweight jacket

    Lightweight navy blue summer jacket/ blouse dating from the 1980s by Jean Claire. Can be worn alone or over a little vest or dress. Can be dressed up or down, special occasions, evening, events, workwear. Features pretty sparkly buttons to the front and sleeves, two pockets, collarless with button fastening up to round neckline. Loose style typical of the 1980s.
    100% polyester.

    Size 16-18UK

    Measurements approx.
    Chest armpit to armpit 22″
    Length from back of neck to hemline 26″

    Find more great vintage items in my shop @:
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/dottysvintagefinds

  • 80s cerise pink linen look short sleeved fitted Jacket, weddings and events, vintage 1980s

    Gorgeous fitted jacket in cerise pink in typical 1980s style with short sleeves, shoulder pads and rever collar, 2 front pockets, single breasted with 3 button fastening, fully lined and has had very light use so comes in excellent condition.
    Perfect for special occasions, events, weddings and holidays.
    First Avenue Classics size UK14 please check measurements below.
    Modal/polyester.
    Measurements approx:
    Across chest armpit to armpit 20″
    Length from back of neck to hemline 24″

    Find more great vintage items in my shop @:
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/dottysvintagefinds

    £18.00£22.00
  • Vintage Le Soir gold beaded handbag | heavily beaded evening bag | 1970s-80s | art deco style

    Le Soir decorative gold beaded bag in good vintage condition dating from around the 1970s-80s and made in Korea.
    A few beads missing from edges (please see photos) but not noticeable until close inspection, internally lined in creamy yellow satin type fabric with a small pocket. Gold metal clasp fastening and a chain shoulder strap which is a multi colour metal rope style.
    Vintage art deco style perfect for your vintage events, evening wear etc.

    Measurements approx:
    9″ x 6″

    Find more great vintage & vintage style items in my shop @:
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/dottysvintagefinds

  • St Michael vintage black and white ethnic print gathered midi skirt | pleated skirt

    Striking black and white print skirt from St Michael dating from around the 1980s-90s. It comes in excellent condition having had light wear only. Soft pleats fall beautifully from the waist. Unlined. Perfect for spring and summer.
    Fastens with a zip and button to the side.
    100% polyester.
    Made in the UK.
    Size 10 UK please check measurements below.

    To fit waist 25″ (63cm)
    Length 29″

  • Vintage Nazy Cook textured fabric pale pink skirt, made in France, 1980s, wedding and special occasion wear

    Perfect little vintage pale pink skirt by Nazy Cook made in France. Dating from around the 1980s or earlier this fully lined skirt comes in very good clean condition.
    Pale pink and white crinkle texture fabric: viscose/acetate/polyamide
    Lining: acetate
    Perfect for your special occasion, wedding or formal event.
    Size 10 UK
    Waist measures 27″
    Length 24″

    Find more great vintage items in my shop @:
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/dottysvintagefinds

  • Vintage smart red a line skirt by the Cotswold Collection, cotton linen mix skirt, smart day wear

    This is a gorgeous fully lined a line style skirt in red by Cotswold Collection. Dating from around the 1980s it has 2 pockets to the hips, stiched panel detail, slight elastication to the waist at sides, belt loops, zip fastening to the back. It comes in beautiful condition and is fully lined.
    Cotton/polyester/linen mix fabric.
    Lining acetate.

    Perfect for smart daywear, office, business or dress up for evening.

    Made in England.

    Size 12 as per label but please check measurements below.

    Waist 28″
    Length 28″

    Find more great vintage items in my shop @:
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/dottysvintagefinds

  • Ladies brown leather vintage snake print shoes | size 4 | unworn condition | slip on courts | 2″ heels

    This is a really lovely pair of quality vintage brown leather shoes in unworn condition. They are made in England and date from around the 1980s. Brand is Elmdale.
    Slip on style with 2″ (5cm) heels.
    UK size 4 (EU 37)

    Find more great vintage items in my shop @:
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/dottysvintagefinds

  • Vintage pink and white pretty lace trim on original card | made in Nottingham | retro lace trim | craft supplies | 1970s-80s

    This vintage design pink and white lace trimming comes in unused condition still with original card packaging. Made in Nottingham by E & A Richards Ltd. A vintage item dating from the 1970s-80s.
    Perfect for your craft or dressmaking projects.

    Approx 5 metres of lace which measures 6cm in width.

    Find more great vintage & vintage style items in my shop @:
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/dottysvintagefinds

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